Designing Interaction
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Designing Interaction Psychology at the Human-Computer Interface (Cambridge Series on Human-Computer Interaction) by John Millar Carroll

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Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Human-Computer Interaction,
  • User interfaces (Computer syst,
  • Programming Languages - General,
  • Computers - Languages / Programming,
  • Psychology,
  • User interfaces (Computer systems),
  • Programming - General,
  • Computers / Social Aspects / General,
  • Psychological aspects

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages343
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7739526M
ISBN 100521400562
ISBN 109780521400565

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Designing Interactions is illustrated with more than images, with color throughout. Accompanying the book is a DVD that contains segments from all the interviews intercut with examples of the interactions under by: Designing Interactions Digital Technology has changed the way we interact with everything from the games we play to the tools we use at work. Designers of digital technology products no longer regard their job as designing a physical object—beautiful or utilitarian—but as designing our interactions with it.   Dan Saffer's book is a thorough yet high-level look at the emerging and evolving practice of Interaction Design. Although each chapter could easily be its own book and in most cases, such books exist the shallow-yet-broad scope of Designing For Interaction was appealing/5. Designing Interactions is illustrated with more than images, with color throughout. Accompanying the book is a DVD that contains segments from all the interviews intercut with examples of the interactions under discussion. Interviews with:9/10().

Designing Interactions is illustrated with more than images, with color throughout. Accompanying the book is a DVD that contains segments from all the interviews intercut with examples of the interactions under discussion. This thought-provoking new edition of Designing for Interaction offers the perspective of one of the most respected experts in the field, Dan Saffer. This book will help you. learn to create a design strategy that differentiates your product from the competition. It is the only interaction design book that is coming from a designers point of view rather than that of an engineer. This much-needed guide is more than just a how-to manual. It covers interaction design fundamentals, approaches to designing, design research, and more, and spans all mediums—Internet, software, and devices. Even robots! Designing Interaction, first published in , presents a broadbased and fundamental re-examination of human-computer interaction as a practical and scientific endeavor. The chapters in this well-integrated, tightly focused book are by psychologists and computer scientists in industry and academia, who examine the relationship between contemporary psychology and human-computer interaction.2/5(1).

  Designing for Interaction succeeds as a quick survey of the landscape of IxD, suitable for familiarizing a project manager or an individual considering it as a career with the breadth of the practice. However, its broader discussions about design theory, product-development practices, and the like are less successful, because of their lack of attention to detail. Description. Designing Interactive Systems is the most authoritative textbook in the areas of human–computer interaction (HCI), usability, consumer experience and interaction design. David Benyon has updated the book based on extensive user feedback to provide a challenging and exciting teaching resource for courses in this area.   Designing for Interaction is an introduction to the practice of interaction design, the design discipline behind such products as the iPhone and other touchscreen devices and innovative Web sites like Flickr. Aimed at new practitioners and students--as well as user experience professionals and developers--it is a comprehensive look at the discipline, from current methods to its future. Interaction designers aren't usually required to do design research. As noted in Chapter 2, many designers don't; instead, they trust their instincts, knowledge, and experience to create products. And in some cases, especially on small projects or in a subject area the designer knows well, this may be the correct approach.